They're Beloved! No. 14

Things we enjoyed this week and hope that you will too! Houstonian Pushcart Prize winner, National Book Award winner, and...Thanksgiving things!

In case you thought we'd forgotten the round up for this week, we didn't! Better late than never, right? I really just have two news items. The rest are just fun Thanksgiving-themed things from around the Internet. Enjoy!

 
Daniel Pena, author of "Safe Home."

Daniel Pena, author of "Safe Home."

Houstonian wins Pushcart Prize: A 28-year-old assistant professor at the University of Houston-Downtown has won the Pushcart Prize for short fiction. Daniel Pena wrote "Safe Home," which was first published last year in the literary journal Ploughshares. "Safe Home" will appear in the 2017 Pushcart Prize Anthology.

 
Colson Whitehead, author of The Underground Railroad.

Colson Whitehead, author of The Underground Railroad.

National Book Award winners announced: This news is a little over a week old, but I thought it was worth highlighting. The National Book Foundation announced its winners in fiction, nonfiction, young people's literature, and poetry. Colson Whitehead took first place in fiction for his novel The Underground Railroad, a novel about a runaway slave from Georgia who searches for a new life in the northern states while eluding the slave catcher determined to return her to slavery. Check out Whitehead's acceptance speech, a longer summary of the novel, and an interview with Whitehead about his work. For a full list of the winners and the finalists, check out this link (winners are in bold type). (Also, yes, it's Entertainment Weekly, but the list is well organized.)

 
The March family made the list. Of course they did.

The March family made the list. Of course they did.

Thanksgiving with literary families: Have you every thought about what it would be like to spend Thanksgiving with some of your favorite literary families? This list contains some of my favorite literary families, and it's fun to imagine what a Thanksgiving with them would be like. The Weasleys? Controlled chaos.

 
This is seed cake, according to the Oxford University Press blog. It looks a lot tastier than it sounds.

This is seed cake, according to the Oxford University Press blog. It looks a lot tastier than it sounds.


Thanksgiving foods from literature: For all of you who have dreamed of planning Thanksgiving around literary works, the Oxford University Press blog has compiled a list for inspiration. There's the turkey from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (okay, turkey is normal, and the novel takes place during Christmas, but whatever), but there's also seed cake from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. I don't remember seed cake, so clearly it's time for a reread.

 
This is a rutabaga. I had to look it up.

This is a rutabaga. I had to look it up.

Origins of fall vegetable names: Ever wonder where the word "rutabaga" came from? Mental Floss has compiled a list of fall harvest vegetables, most of which are traditionally eaten at Thanksgiving and Christmas, and how they got their names.

 

Image credit: "Rutabaga" by Ianqui Doodle is licensed under CC by-NC-ND 2.0.

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