No More, No Less Than Five Posts You Missed in August

 
 

Well here we are, a month in to "real" blogging, and it feels like we've stacked up quite the history of excellent posts. I know you agree. I also know you didn't actually read all of them, so shame on you, but also, I have begat a great love for you and got your back. So if you are going to check out anything from August, make your way through these (and if you intend to keep in touch during September, I especially recommend you check out #5 - good things are coming):

1. Christian Wiman reciting "These Poems, She Said" by Robert Bringhurst:

Here is a poem, devastating, perhaps, to some writers, but a favorite of mine (it's Will, by the way, hello): “These Poems, She Said,” by Robert Bringhurst. Supplement this with the beautiful audio version below, read by Christian Wiman during his interview with Krista Tippett at On Being

 

2. Writing and the Paradox of Choice:

Sarah has some help for you when you just can't get moving.

"The blinking cursor on the screen can be the most intimidating thing in the world."

"The blinking cursor on the screen can be the most intimidating thing in the world."

3. Art of the Zoom:

Will encourages you to step back or step forward, but just don't stay where you are.

"What started seeping into me on, I don’t know, my second-thousandth time around the world, seeing all the ancient scars, was the incredible temporal patience of the world.” 

"What started seeping into me on, I don’t know, my second-thousandth time around the world, seeing all the ancient scars, was the incredible temporal patience of the world.” 

4. With No Regrets:

Check out the most-visited poem posted in August from Lodestone Issue 2.

"My best effort / Is not enough / To teach you / That birds don't sing in winter"

"My best effort / Is not enough / To teach you / That birds don't sing in winter"

5. The School by Donald Barthelme

Short Story of the Month: The School, by Donald Barthelme (open source). A hilarious and dark look at death, this extremely short short story takes a fun spin into absurdity that leaves you both uncomfortable and hopeful about creating meaning in life. Don't be surprised if you see this story show up again soon, with a nice melancholic essay. Find this and other short stories in Sixty Stories

 

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