They're Beloved! No. 8

Things we enjoyed this week and hope that you will too! We celebrated Curiosity Day with monkeys, read Shakespeare-inspired post-colonialist poetry, and planned trips around the world to beautiful bookstores.

The Slave Ship (1840), by William Turner. Image Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

The Slave Ship (1840), by William Turner. Image Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Gabble Like a Thing Most Brutish: Poet Safiya Sinclair shares her passionate thoughts on Caliban from Shakespeare's The Tempest in her essay for the Poetry Foundation: "Gabble Like a Thing Most Brutish." Caliban stoked her "affinity for anguish" as a woman coming of age in Jamaica and struggling with the difficulties of expectations, colonialism, racism, and identity: 

Circling the ocean-magic and a poet’s finality at the end of his life, I combed through The Tempest for every word and slur Caliban was called and alchemized there the rage of my family, my country, my identity. Mother, your cannibal lives there. What was once seen as monstrous, I sought to make beautiful. This was my final reading. Caliban’s anger is my father’s anger is my anger. What my native dialect of patois represents, and what my poetry represents, is not only a linguistic rebellion against colonization but also a willful remaking of the world to reflect all aspects of the Caribbean self. I am Caliban. I am cannibal. Dear Father, may I unjungle it?

 

 
El Lissitzky, “Proun 93. Floating Spiral.” PHOTOGRAPH BY FINE ART IMAGES / HERITAGE / GETTY

El Lissitzky, “Proun 93. Floating Spiral.” PHOTOGRAPH BY FINE ART IMAGES / HERITAGE / GETTY

Some Beautiful Twitter Game: Check out Lebanese-American novelist Rabih Alamedinne's twitter game here. Alamedinne turns to twitter to share works of art as a way to cope with writer's block. Alameddine shares his thoughts and reasoning with The New Yorker:

Signs of his inching progress appear in the images he shares while in the creative throes. “The more beautiful the image, the more frustrated I am in my writing,” he told me recently. “If I post a whole series of Matisse, then I’ve reached a dead end. If I do Monet, I’m going nowhere.”
 
(www.vickyflipfloptravels.com)

(www.vickyflipfloptravels.com)

Bookstores for Book Lovers: The Independent put together a list of the 12 Bookstores Every Reader Should Visit In Their Lifetime. Obviously, that seems like a high bar to set for most of us, with the amount of travelling that would require, but they identified three in America that our US readers can at least make into a road trip! Tell us some of your must-visit bookstores in the comments. Mine (Will's) would be Townie Books in Crested Butte, Colorado. With limited space, they've curated their selection with their love of reading. You can bet someone who works there has read any of the books they stock, and every one of them is a gem.

 

Curiosity Day 2016: Curious George turned 75 this week, and the Washington Post writes about why the monkey we all know has endured this long. 

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